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Efficient Energy Solutions

 
At Climate Care Heating & Air Conditioning, we provide efficient and effective energy solutions at prices that don’t break your bank!
 
 
 
 

Systems

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
As much as half of the energy used in your home goes to heating and cooling. So making smart decisions about your home's heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) system can have a big effect on your utility bills — and your comfort.

As a homeowner, you can easily be overwhelmed by questions when it comes time to understand HVAC systems and to choose what fits your needs. Deciding which HVAC system is right for your home shouldn’t be a complicated process. So we’ve made learning about HVAC and electrical systems easier.
 
 
 

Central Heating And Cooling Air Conditioning Systems

 

 
 

Central Cooling

 
The most common central cooling system is a split system, which includes an outdoor cabinet containing a condenser coil and compressor, and an indoor evaporator coil, usually installed in conjunction with your furnace or air handler. The compressor pumps a chemical called refrigerant through the system.
Once warm air inside your home blows across the indoor evaporator coil, its heat energy transfers to the refrigerant inside the coil. That transfer, in turn, “cools” the air.

The refrigerant is pumped back to the compressor where the cycle begins again. The heat absorbed by the refrigerant is moved outside your home while cooled air is blown inside. Moisture that contributes to humidity is also condensed out of the air. Your cooling system is usually combined with your central heating system because they share the same ductwork for distributing conditioned air throughout your home.
 
 
 

Central Heating

 
Central heating systems have a primary heating appliance, such as a furnace, typically located in your basement or garage. All furnaces consist of four main components:

  1. burners that deliver and burn fuel
  2. heat exchangers
  3. a blower and
  4. a flue that acts as an exhaust for gaseous by-products.

Depending on your situation, region, and needs, you can choose from heating systems running on either gas or oil as fuel, or a hybrid packaged system that can use both fuel types. Combustion gases are generated by ... Read more
 
 
 
 
 

Geothermal Heat Pumps

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

About Geothermal Heat Pumps

 
A heat pump is an all-in-one heating and cooling system. It heats a home in winter and then cools it in summer. What kind of magic does a heat pump perform to both heat and cool your air? Think of a heat pump as a heat juggler. Even in air that’s below freezing temperatures, heat energy is present. When it’s cold outside a heat pump extracts this outside heat and transfers it inside. When it’s warm outside, it reverses directions and acts like an air conditioner, removing heat from your home.
One advantage of a heat pump is that it moves heat instead of generating heat, giving you more energy efficiency. Also, it is powered by electricity, so you can save substantially on fuel consumption.
Ge... Read more
 
 
 

How Do They Work?

 
Remember, a geothermal heat pump doesn't create heat by burning fuel, like a furnace does. Instead, in winter it collects the Earth's natural heat through a series of pipes, called a loop, installed below the surface of the ground or submersed in a pond or lake. Fluid circulates through the loop and carries the heat to the house. There, an electrically driven compressor and a heat exchanger concentrate the Earth's energy and release it inside the home at a higher temperature. Ductwork distributes the heat to different rooms. In summer, the process is reversed. The underground loop draws excess heat from the house and allows it to be absorbed by the Earth. The system cools your home in the same way that a refrigerator keeps your food cool - by drawing heat from the interior, not by blowing in cold air.
 
 
 
 
 

Durability

 
Geothermal heat pumps are durable and require little maintenance. They have fewer mechanical components than other systems, and most of those components are underground, sheltered from the weather. The underground piping used in the system is often guaranteed to last 25 to 50 years and is virtually worry-free. The components inside the house are small and easily accessible for maintenance. Warm and cool air are distributed through ductwork, just as in a regular forced-air system. Since geothermal systems have no outside condensing units like air conditioners, they are quieter to operate.
 
 
 

How Do They Compare?

 
Surveys taken by utilities have found that homeowners using geothermal heat pumps rate them highly when compared to conventional systems. Figures indicate that more than 95 percent of all geothermal heat pump owners would recommend a similar system to their friends and family.
 
 
 
 
 

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We have efficient solutions for properly utilizing energy!